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Commonwealth of Massachusetts 



Department of Education 




Division of Immigration and Americanization 



FORTY EIGHTH 
ANNUAL REPORT 



July 1, 1964 - June 30, 1965 



.*.#**• 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



DR. OWEN B. KIERNAN - COMMI SSI ONER 
DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 
MRS. TEOFILIA K. TATTAN - SUPERVISOR OF SOCIAL SERVICE 



BOARD OF THE DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 



Term Expires 



1966 Mrs. Gemma Valenti - Medford 

1965 Mrs. Carol Offenbach - Melrose 

1965 Mr. Bernard Harmon - Brookline 

1966 Mr. Robert E. Patenaude - No. Adams 

1967 Mrs. Mary E. Twomey - Belmont 
1967 Mrs. Eleanor Davoren - Milford 



Chairman 



DISTRICT IMMIGRATION AGENTS 



Mr. Andrew W. Ansara 
Mr. Daniel J. Donahue 
Mr. John A. Mclnnes 
Mr. Edmund B. Meduski 



Lawrence Office, 477 Essex Street 
Fall River Office, 51 Franklin Street 
Springfield Office, 235 Chestnut Street 
Worcester Office, 74 Front Street 



PUBUGATION No. 270 APPROVED BY ALFRED C. HOLLAND, STATE PURCHASING AGt 



ANNUAL REPORT 
DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1965 

On June 30, 1965, the Division of Immigration and Americanization 
completed 48 years of total . service, and 46 years as a part of the Depart- 
ment of Education. Established in 1917 as the Bureau of Immigration and 
operating as an individual office, with the change of deparmental make-up, 
the Bureau of Immigration became the Division of Immigration and Americani- 
zation with the same functions and duties. 

By statute, the Division is directed to employ such methods, consis- 
tent with law as in its judgment will tend to: 

1. Bring into sympathetic and mutually helpful 
relations the Commonwealth and its residents 
of foreign origin; 

2. Protect immigrants from exploitation and 
abuse ; 

3. Stimulate their acquisition and mastery of 
English; 

4. Develop their understanding of American 
Government, institutions and ideals; 

5. Generally promote their assimilation and 
naturalization. 

When the original Bureau of Immigration was abolished in 1919 and its 
functions and duties transferred to the Department of Education, the work was 
organized as the Division of Immigration and Americanization under the Com- 
missioner of Education with a Director and an Advisory Board of six persons. 
In 1933, the position of Director was made a paid one and otherwise the Divi- 
sion operated under the Commissioner of Education with a Director and an 
Advisory Board. 

Chapter 409 of the Acts of 1939 materially changed the organization 
of the Division making it the only Division in the Department of Education 
which is without a Director. Chapter 409 provides: "That the name of the 
Advisory Board be changed to the Board of Immigration and Americanization. 
That the Board shall consist of six persons. Two members of the Board are to 
be appointed annually for three years by the Governor with the advice and 
consent of the Council. The Governor shall designate one of the members as 
the Chairman. The Board shall meet at least once a month at such time as it 
may by rule determine and when requested by any member thereof. The members 
of the Board shall receive no compensation for their service." 

The Board of Immigration and Americanization has been functioning 
through the years and the Division given the guidance, concern and interest 
of many dedicated community leaders of many ethnic origins. 

With the enactment of Chapter 572 in June 1965, as an outcome of the 
Report of the Special Commission headed by Senator Harrington, the Board of 
Immigration and Americanization is abolished and it charges the Board of 
Higher Education with the provisions of the program of Immigration and Ameri- 
canization in the Commonwealth when such a board is established. 



The Division recorded 42,660 services for the past year in its five 
offices: Boston, 23,615; Fall River, 4,178; Lawrence, 5,838; Springfield, 
3,697; and Worcester, 5,332 as the charts appended to this report show. 

NATIONALITY AND ETHNIC BACKGROUNDS 

Of the 104 countries of birth we list in the statistics, the largest 
group is Italian - 5,712 of whom 3,667 were served in Boston; then 5,081 
Canadian born; 4,213 born in the United States; 3,871 for Portuguese clients; 
3,367 Cubans; 2,488 Polish; 1,800 born in Ireland; 1,7S5 for persons born in 
Greece; 1,405 for German born residents; 1,147 born in England; 771 in China 
and less for the other nationalities named as the chart shows. The Italians 
and Canadians record the largest number of noncitizens in the Commonwealth 
and, naturally, have the problems of family reunions, citizenship applica- 
tions, etc. The Cubans are a large portion of those assisted as so many are 
applying for change of status to permanent residence. Also, they are execut- 
ing documents for family reunions via Spain and Mexico. Many of the Philip- 
pine born nationals listed are Servicemen who, now married to citizens of the 
United States, were assisted in getting a record of permanent entry into the 
United States and thus be naturalized. Many of the South American applicants 
who had come to the United States on temporary status as visitors or students, 
were aided in applications to become permanent residents of the United States. 
The citizens of the United States are one of the larger groups and they repre- 
sent not only those who were born in the United States and have never left 
its shores and now sponsoring relatives, etc., but many are persons born in 
the United States who had lived abroad for many years. Now, having married 
and returned to the United States, were assisted in execution of procedures 
for family reunions. Of this group, many come from Portugal. 

LOCALITIES SERVED 

The greatest number of services were recorded for clients who resided 
in the cities where our offices are maintained, although practically every 
town and city of the Commonwealth is represented. The localities in order of 
numbers are: 



Boston 


- 10,926 


Worcester 


3,264 


Lawrence 


2,579 


Fall River 


2,273 


Springfield 


1,963 


Cambridge 


1,830 


Lowell 


1,634 


New Bedford 


1,165 etc. 


ALIENS IN 


MASSACHUSETTS 



The 1965 Alien Registration required by the United States Government 
records 133,000 noncitizens in this State of which 122,492 are permanent 
residents and 10,500 other than permanent with the following numbers: 



NATIONALITIES 

Canada - 34,581 

Italy - 13,262 

United Kingdom - 10,817 

Poland - 8,953 

Ireland - 6,375 

Germany - 5,156 

U.S.S.R. - 1,824 

Cuba - 1,507 

Netherlands - 1,459 

Japan - 465 

Mexico - 221 

Philippines - 214 

Massachusetts is seventh is the states with number of aliens 



1. California 

2. New York 

3. Texas 

4. Illinois 

5. New Jersey 

6. Florida 

7. Massachusetts 

8. Michigan 

9. Pennsylvania 
10. Ohio 



TOTAL 
810,440 
620,119 
245,880 
197,734 
176,835 
175,219 
133,000 
131,210 
102,465 

82 , 320 



PERMANENT RESIDENCE 
756,841 
555,090 
235,580 
181,033 
162,225 

98,562 
122 , 492 
123,555 

93,637 

75,475 



TEMPORARY 

53,559 

65,029 

10,300 

16,701 

14,610 

76,657 

10,508 

7,655 

8,828 

6,845 



MASSACHUSETTS .iXJREIGN BORN 

- ■ ■ ■ — — 

The 1960 census lists 5,149,317 residents for Massachusetts. 4.1% of 
these are aliens, but the so-called foreign stock ratio is 40%. Foreign stock 
is defined by the Census Bureau as those of foreign birth and natives of 
foreign or mixed foreign and native parentage. 

TOTAL POPULATION - MASSACHUSETTS 5,149,317 

Native born 4,572,865 - 88.8% 

Native parentage 3,091,008 - 60% 

Foreign or mixed parentage . .1,481,857 - 28.8% 
Foreign born 576,452 - 11.2% 



Persons in Massachusetts of "foreign stock" are 2,058,309 or 40% of 
the total population of the State. The census breakdown of countries of 



origin for this is as follows: 



Canada 


547,236 


Italy 


311,053 


Ireland 


276,166 


United Kingdom 


193,137 


Poland 


136,942 


U.S.S.R. 


129,386 


Portugal 


95,328 


Germany 


54,748 


Sweden 


51 , 101 


Lithuania 


40,921 


Asia 


40,474 


Greece 


34,007 


Other Europe 


19,050 


Finland 


18,708 


Austria 


17,089 


Other America 


16,278 


France 


13,108 


Not Reported 


11,760 


Norway 


10,501 


All Other 


9,586 


Czechoslovakia 


6,388 


Denmark 


5,869 


Netherlands 


5,347 


Hungary 


4,979 


Rumania 


3,354 


Switzerland 


3,086 


Yugoslavia 


1,402 


Mexico 


1,305 


TOTAL FOREIGN STOCK 


2,058,309 


NEWLY ARRIVED 


IMMIG RANTS 



Of the 292,248 immigrants admitted to the United States for the year 
1964, 12,650 persons came to Massachusetts as their first destination from 
the following countries of birth: 



Canada 


4 


,114 


United Kingdom 


1 


,569 


Ireland 




836 


Italy 




813 


Germany 




657 


Poland 




526 


Greece 




277 


Nor way , De nmar k , Swe de n 




255 


Cuba(permanent residents) 




254 


China 




190 


U.S.S.R. 




75 


Japan 




72 


Philippines 




32 


Yugoslavia 




22 


Mexico 




20 


All Other 


2 


,938 



In the last ten years, 113,645 immigrants came to Massachusetts: 

1955 8,817 

1956 11,742 

1957 11,260 

1958 10,128 

1959 9 , 855 

1960 11,953 

1961 12,091 

1962 11,578 

1963 13,571 

1964 12,650 

We send a letter of welcome to every new immigrant destined to this 
Commonwealth and last year we sent 6,981 letters. 2,902 such applicants 
contacted our offices for information and assistance. Some asked about 
school information, others selective service registration, hospital and 
recreation facilities, as well as community resources. We helped many in 
making necessary petitions to establish priority quota for families left 
behind. Referrals to job opportunities were the concern of some, as well as 
the many questions regarding travel and visits abroad. To become established 
in new surroundings with a language handicap, as have many of the new arri- 
vals, requires determination and stamina, to be finally assimilated and feel a 
part of the new "country". In the past year, we had contact with a large 
group of young ladies from several countries who had come to work as domes- 
tics. They were sponsored by persons previously unknown to them. It was 
generally noted that those who came to towns rather distant from Boston were 
anxious to fulfill their contracts and leave for cities where they felt edu- 
cational programs were greater, as well as social contacts. The newcomers 
who came to close relatives were those who became a part of the community life 
faster. 



CUBANS 

The Cuban group in Massachusetts is one of our major projects. 2,255 
services were rendered to them. Many are presently being assisted in chejige 
of status from parolees to permanent residents. The applications must be 
initiated at the American Consulate in Montreal for tham. Because of the 
heavy registration of such applicants, it is taking about one year for initial 
attention after registration. Translation of documents, execution of neces- 
sary applications, as well as getting police clearances prolongs the procedure 
and requires much correspondence but has the rewarding effect on the appli- 
cant of at last really belonging. A number whose applications were initiated 
in our office have moved out of state. The mobility of a newcomer seeking to 
establish himself is also that of the parolee Cuban. Some Congressmen are 
concerned with assisting this group in becoming permanent residents by special 
legislation, as had to be enacted for the Hungarian Freedom Fighters. So far, 
no action has been given to such recommendations and the many who seek per- 
manent residence in the United States must follow the procedure of getting : 
the immigrant visas outside of the United States at some cost. Our Spanish 
speaking Social Worker is heavily burdened with assistance to this group, a 
great majority non-English speaking. 



Family separations are still many with children, parents, brothers 
and sisters yet remaining in Cuba.l For some, the path has been from Cuba to 
Spain and thence to the United States with affidavits made by relatives in 
the United States, A few have come to Massachusetts via Jamaica. The pre- 
sent procedure of requesting temporary visa to enter Mexico from Cuba has 
been taking months for favorable action. Then, another set of affidavits 
must be executed for the American Consul. A number of relatives have been 
successful in coming this way, many still await attention. The case of the 
mother who was initially granted a waiver by the Department of State .for her 
minor son, when transportation was available directly from Cuba to the United 
States, still waits for his arrival. Not having been successful in 1962 in 
getting the passport and permission to depart, and now having requested en- 
trance into Mexico some six months ago, the mother and son are trying and 
keep hoping for the reunion in the United States. 

IMMIGRATION PROBLEMS 

For the many Canadians listed, our services have covered all aspects 
of affidavits of support, assistance in change of status to permanent resi- 
dence, citizenship applications and establishing residence. There, at least, 
is no problem of quota restrictions. Many of the Canadians enter frist as 
visitors and then, with family ties in the United States, it is a compara- 
tively simple procedure to get the necessary documents, sponsorships and 
finally the appointments from the Consuls in Canada for issuance of immigrant 
visas. Of course, with necessary compliance of health requirements, police 
clearances, etc. 

However, from the countries of heavy immigrant registrations, many 
problems of family separation exists. The largest group affected is the 
Italians. Brothers and sisters, the beneficiaries of fourth preference cate- 
gory petitions, wait their turn since 1954; a wife and children of a legally 
resident alien wait since 1961. Recently, a widowed dottier who came to the 
United States on the petition of her United States citizen daughter, the bride 
of three years of a Serviceman, hoped to be reunited with her unmarried 
children she had left abroad. Her approved petition established third pre- 
ference priority, but after waiting one year in hopes for them to join her 
under the law, she has returned to Italy. 

The Turkish born parent, or parents born in Greece, must wait many 
years to join their citizen children in the United States under the present 
law in force since establishment of the quotas in 1924. Receiving active 
attention now of the Legislators in Congress, H. R. 2580, a bill sponsored by 
the President and a great number of legislators, would solve many of these 
problems. 

Briefly, the bill contains the following major provisions: 

1, The national origins quota system will be fully abolished by 
July 1, 1968. 

2. An annual ceiling of 170,000 immigrants is established exclusive 
of all the western Hemisphere, exclusive of spouses, unmarried children under 



21 years and parents of United States citizens. 

After July 1, 1968, no country is to receive more than 20,000 per 
year of the total 170,000, 

During the interim period, beginning with the enactment of H. R. 2850 
and ending June 30, 1968, unused quota numbers are transferred to an immigra- 
tion pool to be used by countries whose quotas are oversubscribed. Appli- 
cants will be taken on a first come, first served basis within the percentage 
limitation in the order of priority specified in Sec. 203 of the Immigration 
and Nationality Act. 

3. The Asia Pacific Triangle provisions are abolished immediately. 

4. Beginning July 1, 1968, immigrants under the 170,000 ceiling will 
be admitted on a first come, first served basis according to the following 
preferences: 

First Preference: 20% - Unmarried sons and daughters over 21 years 
of United States citizens. 

Second Preference: 20% - Spouses and unmarried sons and daughters of 
permanent resident aliens. 

Third Preference: 10% - Persons who have high professional skills. 

Fourth Preference: 10% - Married sons and daughters of United 
States citizens. 

Fifth Preference: 24% - Brothers and sisters of United States 
citizens. 

Sixth Preference: 10% - Persons with skills in crafts needed in the 
United States for which a demonstrable shortage exists. 

Seventh Preference: 6% - Refugees on "conditional entry." 

A most recent amendment to the bill is to establish a ceiling of 
120,000 from the countries of the Western Hemisphere who, to date, have been 
classified as "nonquota". 

Enactment of this law would prevent hardships of separation in many 
cases. It would help the Portuguese born resident young lady who returned to 
Portugal for a visit, married there, and on return, executed the necessary 
petition to establish the third preference category permitted her under the 
present law for her husband* Persons in this category registered in 1953 are 
still waiting for their turn. 

Another provision of the new law gives the husband of a citizen the 
privilege of adjusting his status in the United States even though he had 
arrived in the United States as a seaman. The situation of Mr. K. is one of 
many. Horn in Greece, he came to the United States as a seaman on shore leave 



to visit relatives and did not return to his ship. Within the year, he was 
married to a citizen of the United States. They established their little 
home and had their first baby. Mr. K. applied to the United States Immigra- 
tion Service for adjustment of status and was given voluntary departure rather 
than deportation because of his family status. Where was he to apply for a 
visa as the law required him to apply for such visa outside the United States? 
He could only obtain a passport to return to the country of his birth where 
military draft awaited him and separation from his family for several years. 
Applications were made at several consulates nearby but were not accepted. 
Finally, arrangements were made and he traveled to Europe where visa was 
issued after much correspondence, arranging appointments and travel on a 
Certificate of Identity was accepted. His application, initiated January, 
1963, culminated in securing the visa in June, 1965 - 2*§ years later. 1 2 ! 12 

This helpful legislation is awaited by many, many relatives awaiting 
family reunions and it is expected that the workload of the Division will be 
exceedingly heavy since many new petitions, as well as affidavits of support, 
etc. , will be necessary. It would appear that adjustment of status in the 
United States would be available to many spouses of citizens not now eligible. 

What effect the establishment of a quota for the countries of the 
Western Hemisphere will have will be interesting to note as newcomers from 
Canada to our State have been most numerous to date. 

As the statistics show, we receive many, many requests for information 
regarding immigration laws and procedure and the many affidavits of support 
we execute for relatives and sponsors in the United States embody every 
nationality. Affiants are persons of excellent financial resources, as well 
as those who are newly arrived husbands with steady, permanent jobs, have just 
rented a flat and bought the furniture to wait the arrival of their families. 

FROM BEHIND THE IRON CURTAIN 

Notably, some ten families in the past year in the Boston vicinity 
have been reunited with relatives from behind the Iron Curtain. A brother, 
a sister and a father, one husband and several mothers were at last issued 
exit visas to depart from U, S.S.R. The Lithuanian born wife, who for the 
past six years had renewed her applications for the necessary exit permit 
from the authorities, finally, at Easter, was made happy with the arrival of 
her husband. The elderly Latvian mother and Estonian father are happily re- 
united with their children. Presently, a widowed mother, complying with the 
ever necessary requests, has been rewarded with the news that the permit is 
being given to her daughter to leave U. S. S.R. She is now deciding on leaving 
behing a newly acquired fiancee. Of the number who have been successful, 
many, many more have not received such action. 

An escapee from Bulgaria who went to Germany enlisted there for ser- 
vice in the United States Army under the Lodge Act, finally completed his 
five years service, permitted to come to the United States and was naturaliz- 
ed. His father was able to escape from Bulgaria and entered as a refugee. 



Their wives remain abroad. Even though the American Consulate is ready to 
issue the necessary visas on the approved petitions of their spouses, the 
wives have met refusal the several times they have applied for passports. 
The "blacklisting" of their spouses who had departed without sanction from 
behind the Iron Curtain prevents their reunion. 

CITIZENSHIP 

In Massachusetts, 4,687 persons were naturalized in 1964. The records ; 
show_ our offices filled 2,270 applications for petitions for naturalization. 
It is notable to record that those being naturalized are the rather "newcomer" 
to the United States. As soon as the required five years residence is com- 
pleted, the initial step is taken. Many attend the citizenship classes main- 
tained by the cities and towns in the Commonwealth. We give to each appli- 
cant our booklet, The Constitution of the United States with Questions and 
Answers for Naturalization Examination. Yearly, some 10,000 such issues are 
distributed to applicants for citizenship classes, civic and patriotic 
groups. 

The applications for Derivative Citizenship Certificate involve pro- 
cedures of obtaining the necessary birth, marriage and death records. A case 
in point involved a daughter born in Portugal who derived citizenship through 
her grandfather who was naturalized prior to 1900 under an Americanized name. 
Her father, who had lived in the United States as a minor, returned, married 
in Portugal and had his family there. Coming to the United States as a citi- 
zen, in her efforts to get proof of her citizenship, she had to show residence 
in the United States of her own father prior to his twenty-first birthdate. 
Many months efforts to locate records and witnesses in distant states are not 
yet successful. She is a citizen of the United States, but to get the neces- 
sary certificate proving this fact is still to be solved. We assisted a 
number of persons in regaining their naturalization certificates which had 
been taken from them before the Schneider case ruling. 

EVALUATION 

In highlighting the major aspects of the work of the office, we 
should not overlook the other many roles of our assistance to have the person 
of foreign background assimilated and "in mutually helpful relations with the 
Commonwealth". Our doors are open to where the newcomer may come and discuss 
his problems with a worker in his own native tongue in a comfortable atmos- 
phere and feel that his culture and foreign background is welcome. 

In an evaluation of our work for 1964 t we find an affirmative and 
positive answer to the question, "DOES THE DIVISION FILL A PRESENT NEED?". 
The increase of numbers is one answer to the question. The foreign born need 
and use the service the State has provided for them. Furthermore, the figure 
of the alien registration, over 135,000, show that Massachusetts ranks 
seventh in the number of foreign born. The actual figure of 2,058,309 per- 
sons of foreign origin in Massachusetts indicates that there are still many 
problems of the person with a foreign background within the State. 



The maintenance of the State Program "to bring the Corwicnv/ealth s.nd 
its residents of foreign origin into sympathetic and mutually helpful rela- 
tionship" is an insurance against the success of foreign propaganda. Men, 
Women and children from other lands who have found an office maintained by 
the State helpful in solving their special problems of adjustment and gui- 
dance in the road to American citizenship which most long for, are immune to 
forces seeking "to play upon many strings here". The danger may never become 
a real peril, but the insurance against it by way of a State Program of Ameri- 
canization forms a safe foundation for Constructive Americanism. 

Massachusetts, as a pioneer in many fields, realized its responsibi- 
lity to the foreign born in the Commonwealth by establishment of this 
Division in 1917. The work of the Division has increased in services from 
7,292 in 1919 to 42,660 in 1965. The Division is not only a source where the 
foreign speaking or newly arrived immigrants may come and solve many problems, 
but it serves as a Government agency and helps the Commonwealth to establish 
mutual benefits for the Commonwealth, as well as to the persons of foreign 
birth. 



PUBLIC RELATIONS 

We have the cooperation and contact with many public and private 
social agencies in our mutual assistance and exchange special technical in- 
formation regarding social work problems and information on citizenship and 
immigration matters. Our relations with the United States Immigration and 
Naturalization Service continue with cooperation and assistance from that 
office. Cooperation with teachers and adult civic groups, supervisors and 
directors go on. 

Leaders of various ethnic groups have called on us for assistance and 
explanation of immigration and citizenship laws and encouragement toward 
naturalization. The work of the office has been aired on radio programs and 
newspaper publicity in the past year. As a member of national organizations, 
American Immigration and Citizenship Conference, Social toorker Groups, Massa- 
chusetts United Fund, Inter Relations Groups, we participate in many programs. 

REPORTS OF D T STRICT AGENTS 

SPRINGFIELD OFFICE 

On June 30, 1965, this Agency completed 48 years of service to resi- 
dents of this Commonwealth. During the first two years of our existence, we 
functioned as a separate and independent bureau. In 1919, as a result of the 
consolidation of many departments, boards, bureaus and commissions, we were 
made a part of and brought under the direction of the Department of Education. 
For the past 46 years, we have been known as the Division of Immigration and 
Americanization. 



Our statistics indicate that 3,697 services were provided for resi- 
dents of 50 communities located in the four western counties of our State. 
In addition, we had correspondence with 53 former residents now residing in 
other parts of the country, as well as abroad. 

Nationality and Ethnic Statistics show that we gave services to per- 
sons from 72 countries, the majority coming from Canada, United States, 
Germany, Italy, Poland, Jamaica, Greece, Ireland, Japan and Portugal. 

The majority of citizenship applications during the past year re- 
quired almost immediate attention as the individuals were anxious to complete 
their citizenship at the earliest possible date because of job opportunities 
or because of their intentions to travel abroad. This held true in the case 
of all dependents of servicemen stationed at the Air Force Base here at 
We stover. 

Many inquiries were made concerning the Supreme Court Decision of May 
18, 1964 which declared as unconstitutional the law relating to loss of citi- 
zenship by residence abroad of naturalized citizens. 

As we stated in our last Annual Report, it was hopefully expected 
that the present Congress would give favorable consideration to liberalizing 
the Immigration Laws so that it would permit the reuniting of immediate mem- 
bers of families with their relatives in the United States. Although at this 
writing no change has been made, reports seem to indicate that a change may 
come about as a result of the urging of President Johnson. Whenever publi- 
city on this subject appeared in the news, we were deluged with telephone 
calls, a service not recorded in our statistics. Many times we found it dif- 
ficult to convince the caller that what he or she had read or heard was only 
a;proposal of changes in the Immigration Laws. 

In addition to assisting individuals in the preparation of petitions, 
affidavits of support to sponsor relatives, others to adjust their stay in 
the United States, others to obtain appointments with United States Consular 
Services in Canada to obtain visas, we assisted in several of the so-called 
Chinese "confession" cases. A few of these, because of military service in 
the United States Armed Forces, were permitted to apply fcr citizenship while 
others were granted the privilege to apply to adjust their stay in the United 
States. 

In May of this year, a deportation case pending since 1957 was re- 
activated and the individual given an opportunity to apply for suspension of 
his deportation and to adjust his stay in the United States. Contrary to 
public belief, this certainly indicated how lenient and considerate the 
Federal Government is toward the alien who has a clean record. 

In June, we handled a case of a man wishing to bring his illegitimate 
son, 16 years of age, to reside with him in the United States. He is most 
anxious to educate this boy and give him a better way of life in this country, 
A petition was filed by the spouse of this man on the basis of the United 
States Court Decision of New York City in the case of Nation v. Esperdy . At 
the moment, we are awaiting formal adjudication of this petition. 



During the year, letters of welcome were sent to 646 newly arrived 
immigrants destined to live in our area. These letters serve as a valuable 
link in helping to assist these people to adjust to their new way of life. 
Many of them have expressed amazement, as well as delight at learning that 
someone cares to listen to their problems and endeaver to solve them no 
matter how minute or complex they might be. Having been thus convinced of 
the integrity and ability of our Agency, there is no doubt that the aliens' 
interest to our State and Government will be an asset. 

The Agent has attended final hearings for naturalization at the local 
court and always received the cordial and concerned assistance of the Clerk 
of Court and the Naturalization Examiner. 

Throughout the year, we have had contacts with many of the teachers 
of evening citizenship classes in neighboring communities. We have enjoyed 
pleasant relations with both private and public agencies and we continue to 
receive excellent cooperation and valuable assistance from both the Boston 
and Springfield Offices of the Department of Justice, Immigration and Natur- 
alization Service. 



FALL RIVER OFFICE 

The Fall River Office completed the fiscal year ending June 30, 1965 
with a total of 4,178 services rendered to clients. These clients came from 
32 localities in the Southeastern Massachusetts area. 

This total, 4,178, was an increase in services amounting to 456 from 
the previous fiscal year. The ethnic background of these clients is made up 
of forty-one different nations. 

A total of 483 new arrival slips were received at this office and 
newcomer letters were sent to these individuals informing them of our ser- 
vices. A newcomer letter which is mailed to the immigrant, is not recorded 
in our statistics. Only those who call or write to us for information con- 
cerning a particular problem are then recorded. 

Of the communities served by this branch office, the city of Fall 
River loads the list of clients and the city of New Bedford ranks second. 
This District Agent visits New Bedford one day a week and usually encounters 
a heavy workload on that single day. 

The bulk of the workload consists of citizenship; immigration prob- 
lems; adjustment of status cases and writing letters to local, State and 
Federal agencies. Also corresponding with the Department of State and 
Foreign Service offices throughout the world. 

World tension and upheavals abroad find many persons seeking entrance 
into the United States and small quotas for countries like Greece, Portugal 
and Spain make it next to impossible to immigrate to the United States unless 
they have close family ties. 



The major nationality makeup here in Southeastern Massachusetts 
is of peoples of the small quota country of Portugal. They have an annual 
quota of 438 which includes the Continent and the numerous Azorean Islands. 
The immediate problem of this small Portuguese quota is that hundreds of 
legal resident aliens in this locality are separated from their spouses and 
children. They are third preference quota immigrants and this category is 
oversubscribed for a period of more than ten years, making the separation of 
the family unit a heartbreaking problem. 

New legislation is now pending before the Congress to eliminate the 
present quota system. If and when it is enacted, it will be a hugh step in 
correcting this injustice. The impact of this new legislation, when it be- 
comes law, will also increase the workload due to the fact that thousands of 
brothers and sisters in this area are registered on the Consulates waiting '. 
list as intending immigrants. 

It is evident that the Commonwealth of Massachusetts can look with 
pride in its state-wide program of sympathetic and mutual helpful assistance 
to residents of foreign origin. 

WORCESTER OFFICE 

This office has even taken a part in the space program as employees 
of the manufacturer of space suits for the United States Space Program have 
been assisted in applications for United States citizenship and questions in 
regard to security clearances. 

During the year, we have had a multitude of inquiries concerning 
"Bills" by Congress and statements by President Lyndon B. Johnson to revise 
the present immigration laws, especially by persons whose relatives would be 
affected. At present, the annual quota of 308 for Greece is pathetically low 
and for other countries, such as Italy, even though the annual quota is 5,666, 
it still means a wait of many years for close relatives and family members to 
be reunited. 

In March, we were happy to hear that the Worcester Roman Catholic 
Diocese Catholic Charities will accept Protestant a.nd Catholic home studies 
for inter-country adoptions, and the Jewish Family Services for Jewish famil- 
ies. A law passed in 1961 states "that a home study of the adopting family 
must be done by an accredited agency in the state of the adopting family". 
Although this is beneficial for the child and sponsors, the resulting expense 
and red tape caused social agencies to gradually drop this phase of their 
program until there were none in Worcester county performing such a function. 
This revised policy by these two agencies is a blessing for the children who 
will benefit by it, some of the orphans, as the ones in Korea, are called 
"children of tragedy". This plan will expedite applications pending now for 
several of our clients. 

Worcester, the second largest city in the state, and its environs, 
with substantial groups of Canadian, Greek, Irish, Italian and Polish descent 
persons, first and second generation Americans of kvarious ethnic backgrounds, 
furnished this branch office with 3348 clients for 5,332 services. This ser- 
vice covers many aspects of assimilation, immigration and citizenship of the 
clients. 



The Agent attends the naturalization hearings at Superior Court in 
Worcester. It is gratifying to see the many familiar faces who are now being 
admitted to citizenship. Especially the ones with whom we had a problem such 
as an elderly woman who arrived from Ireland in 1910 but did not remember the 
name of the ship or exact date of arrival. We had a difficult task proving 
residence for her registry application in connection with naturalization. 
Many occupations and professions are represented among the new citizens, but 
it was unusual to have three clergymen sworn in among a group of sixty- three 
persons. The local newspaper pictured them on the front page. 

In another citizenship matter, we assisted five adult members of a 
family who arrived in the United States from Canada in 1944 with their deriva- 
tive applications. They were born between 1930 and 1936; the father was born 
in the United States and the mother was naturalized in 1960. Pertinent re- 
cords had to be obtained as birth and marriage, before applications were 
filed. The group, the children and the parents, were interviewed at one time 
and the various requirements were complied with. Each member of the family 
now has a certificate to prove his own right to United States citizenship. 

The past year showed an increase of clients over last year in this 
area and all phases of immigration, citizenship and newcomer adjustment come 
for our attention. The cosmopolitan atmosphere of this area of Massachusetts 
with its many nationalities, especially with the enacement of new immigration 
legislation, will be a further impetus for the assistance this office will 
give in our efforts "to bring into sympathetic and mutually helpful relations 
the Commonwealth and its residents of foreign origin." 

LAWRENCE OFFICE 

The end of the 1965 fiscal year showed that the Lawrence Office ren- 
dered 5,838 services to the residents of Merrimack Valley. A notable increase 
over last year. This Agent has office hours one day weekly in the Lowell City 
Hall and the statistics show that Lowell residents came for our attention so 
that 1,634 services were given at Lowell. 

One of the most dramatic cases which finally was successfully con- 
cluded after six years of persistence endeavor was the arrival from U.S.S. R. 
of a young adult son to be reunited with his father. He arrived at. Christmas 
time and it was indeed a happy occasion for the father who had first come to 
see me six years ago. He related to me a most amazing story of how, in 1947, 
his former wife had "kidnapped" their six year old son and three teen-age 
daughters in the middle of the night. She had taken the children to New York 
where they boarded a ship destined to the Soviet Union. Mr. X had explained 
to me that the Soviet government was then offering former residents free pas- 
sage back to the Soviet Union plus land for a home. He and his wife had had 
several arguments, since she insisted on returning and he wanted absolutely 
nothing to do with the Soviet Union nor with Communism. 

From that day in 1947 until 1958, Mr. X had tried, unsuccessfully, to 
bring, at least, his son back. From January, 1959 until just before Christ- 
mas, 1964, we worked diligently with the father, exploring all possibilities. 



Finally, the day came when our persistence paid off and the boy was permitted 
to leave the Soviet Union. We are now in the process of execution of papers 

for the sisters and their families and for the mother, who has expressed 

a desire to return. 

Current events are not something we read about in the newspapers, 
but actually influence and guide our work. We have, for example, a young 
lady visiting from the Dominican Republic. She overstayed her time and was 
given voluntary departure to leave the United States. Before she could go, 
hostilities broke out in the Dominican Republic, making it dangerous for her 
to return. So far, her pleas to grant her extensions of stay on a month to 
month basis have been honored by the United States Immigration and Naturali- 
zation Service. 

Then, there are the Cubans. Our pending file on them is still heavy, 
since we are continuing to arrange appointments for them with the American 
Consular authorities in Montreal, Canada so they can receive immigration 
visas. Now, we have taken on an additional task with the Cubans. That is, 
the completion of affidavits of support to the Mexican government so that 
their relatives can obtain transit visas from Cuba to Mexico. Once they are 
in Mexico, we complete affidavits of support to the American authorities so 
the relatives can immigrate to this country. Several families have already 
come in this manner. 

There were sad moments and there were happy moments. Sad, when we 
had to tell a young Italian couple that their mentally-retarded six year old 
son was again refused a visa after another examination conducted by the 
United States Public Health Officer in Naples revealed he was still exclud- 
able. Happy, when we were able to assure a young man married to a citizen of 
the United States that the Immigration and Naturalization Service, which had 
previously denied his application for permanent residence, had reversed their 
decision on our appeal coupled with a representation before the Special 
Inquiry Officer. 

Assistance on citizenship matters, travel information, letters of 
welcome to newcomers, letters to government agencies here and abroad on behalf 
of clients, talks before Americanization classes, the dissemination of radio 
and newspaper publicity, translation and interpretation, interview and re- 
ferral all these, served to round out a most eventful year. As the 

fiscal year drew to a close, we were preparing to move to more spacious quar- 
ters in a section of the city where many government offices will be reloca- 
ting and better serve our applicants. 







2 • y 

O a % 

o) 3 > g 

O < H 5 

CQ fit, DC < 

STATISTICAL DETAIL 


i a 

^ Q & 

HJ U 

a S u 
co fc Q 

All Offices 




FISCAL YEAR 7/1/64 - 6/30/65 


Servic 


2S Give 
2042 


l 

OFFICE 
274 




INFORMATION 


6112 


2104 


3261 


16262 


Booklets, forms, blank 
Citizenship 


5 


1531 


559 


112 


342 


302 


2846 




581 


707 


404 


807 


936 


3435 


Immigration 


3491 


389 


1923 


755 


1293 


7851 


Travel 


134 


19 


200 


123 


727 


1203 


Other 


375 


368 


104 


77 


3 


927 


FORMS FILLED 


5796 


1009 


1422 


757 


1060 


10044 


AR-11 (Change of Addres 
DSP-70( Biographic Data 
DSP-78( Cuban Waiver) 


si 


259 


41 


112 


69 


73 


554 


) 


127 


- 


41 


- 


5 


173 




3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


FS-497(Visa Registrati. 
FS-510(Imm. Visa Applic 
G-28 (Representative R< 
I-53(Alien Registratio 
I-90(Dupl.Alien Reg.Ca 
I-129B(Petition for Vi 
I-130( Relative Petitioi 
I-131(Reentry Permit) 


on) 


235 


6 


58 


11 


10 


320 


ation ) 


190 


- 


61 


5 


8 


264 


ag. ) 


216 


45 


27 


- 


25 


313 


n) 


788 


172 


600 


107 


274 


1941 


rd) 


300 


19 


26 


46 


39 


430 


sa) 


9 


- 


1 


- 


- 


10 


ti) 


515 


86 


58 


50 


76 


785 




147 


- 


14 


9 


27 


197 


I-140(Skilled Labor Pe 
I-191(re:Unrelinquishe 
I-212(Per.to reenter a: 


tition) 


7 


- 


4 


- 


- 


11 


d Dom. ) 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


fter Dep 


) 3 


1 


1 


1 


- 


6 


I -243( Removal to Native Countr; 


3 


- 


1 


- 


- 


4 


I -256A( Suspension Deportation) 




1 


1 


2 


- 


4 


I -290B( Appeal) 


4 


1 


- 


- 


- 


5 


I -484 (Foreign Clearanc. 
I-485(Registry for Cit 
I -485 (Status Adjustmen 
I-506(Temp. Change Sta 
I -539 (Extension Visito: 
I-550(Verif ication Leg 


B) 


28 


- 


- 


- 


2 


30 


Lzenship 
t) 


23 


8 


2 


3 


1 


37 


248 


41 


26 


17 


25 


357 


tus) 


43 


3 


2 


4 


6 


58 


c Stay) 


320 


192 


90 


45 


140 


787 


al Entry 


37 


— 


5 


6 


- 


48 


I -591 (Refugee -Escapee Assuranc< 


>) 2 


— 


- 


- 


- 


2 


I -600 (Orphan Applicati< 
I-601( waiver) 


Dn) 


12 


- 


1 


- 


- 


13 




3 


— 


— 


1 


1 


5 


I-612(Rxch. Student Wa 
Other Immigration Form. 
N-300( Declaration of Ii 
N-400(Pet.for Naturali 
N-401 (Repatriation) 


iver) 


5 


- 




- 




6 




106 


5 


97 


8 


30 


246 


ntention' 


168 


11 


5 


15 


18 


217 


zation) 


1304 


257 


115 


186 


214 


2071 




4 


— 


- 


2 


- 


6 


N-402( Petition Nat. of ( 
N-426(Verification Mil 
N- 565 (Duplicate Certif: 
N-577(Cit. Verification 
N-585(Info. from Recor i 
N-600(Deriv. Cert. Appli. 
Other Naturalization F< 

Page Total 


:hild) 


78 


57 


12 


34 


13 


194 


. Serv. ) 


44 


- 


1 


6 


- 


51 


Lcate) 


129 


7 


16 


15 


8 


175 


Abroad) 
3s) 


2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


4 


130 


- 


5 


8 


5 


148 


nation) 


298 


43 


40 


99 


56 


536 


arms 


4 


13 


- 


6 


3 


26 




11908 


3051 


4165 


2861 


4321 


26306 



EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVITS 


S 

H 
if) 
O 

03 

2327 


it 

213 


CD 
U 

§ 

< 
329 


if) U. 

163 


$ WORCESTER 

O 


| 

O 
H 

3392 


Affidavit of Support 


2005 


80 


201 


97 


270 


2653 


Affidavit of Facts 


75 


6 


46 


2 


4 


133 


Certificate of Identity 


49 


1 


1 


1 


1 


53 


U.S.S.R. Exit Permits 


31 


- 


3 


- 


1 


35 


Polish Assurance 


31 


7 


17 


- 


36 


91 


Other Notarial 


136 


119 


61 


63 


48 


427 




7498 


439 






511 




OTHER SERVICES 


1311 


301 


10060 


Change of Status (Cases) 


535 


52 


74 


33 


33 


727 


Appearance at Hearings 


177 


13 


1 


- 


4 


195 


Interpretation & Trans, 


918 


1 


111 


- 


121 


1151 


Letters 


5863 


313 


954 


263 


353 


7746 


Other 


5 


60 


171 


5 


- 


241 


NEWCOMER INTERVIEW 


1882 


475 


33 


372 


140 


2902 


Page Total 


11707 


1127 


1673 


836 


1011 


16354 


First Page Total 


11908 


3051 


4165 


2861 


4321 


26306 


GRAND TOTAL 


23,615 


4178 


5838 


3697 


5332 


42660 





BOSTON 
ETHNIC A 


? ALL . 
RIVER 

ND NAT: 


LAWRENCE 
ONALITY ST 


SPRIKG- 
FIELD 

\TISTICS 


WORCESTER 
156 


TOTAL 


Albania 


54 


_ 


2 


1 


213 


Algeria 


15 


- 


- 


1 


- 


16 


Antigua 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Argentina 


161 


2 


37 


8 


25 


233 


Armenia(R.or T. ) 


24 


— 


69 


4 


88 


185 


Aruba 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Australia 


24 


- 


7 


3 


.7 


41 


Austria 


118 


9 


5 


12 


19 


163 


Bahamas 


10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


Barbados 


297 


- 


- 


47 


3 


347 


Belgium 


36 


- 


31 


36 


20 


123 


Bermuda 


49 


- 


1 


11 


31 


92 


Bolivia 


83 


- 


7 


- 


- 


90 


Brazil 


202 


21 


11 


- 


19 


253 


Br. Guiana 


13 


— 


— 


- 


- 


13 


Bulgaria- 


27 


- 


2 


2 


- 


31 


Canada 


2,719 


107 


1,064 


547 


644 


5,081 


Ceylon 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Chile 


95 


- 


1 


-. 


- 


96 


China 


467 


196 


40 


26 


42 


771 


Colombia 


202 


12 


55 


3 


34 


306 


Congo 


6 


— 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Costa Rica 


107 


— 


3 


6 


- 


116 


Cuba 


2,265 


3 


883 


55 


161 


3,367 


Cyprus 


15 


- 


4 


- 


1 


20 


Czechoslovakia 


56 


- 


4 


20 


5 


85 


Danzig 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Denmark 


77 


- 


1 


15 


14 


107 


Dominican Republic 


106 


— 


82 


3 


4 


195 


Ecuador 


81 


- 


53 


6 


- 


140 


Egypt 


73 


5 


49 


7 


16 


150 


El Salvador 


24 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24 


England 


577 


93 


127 


205 


145 


1,147 


Estonia 


7 


- 


2 


- 


2 


11 


Finland 


21 


- 


6 


5 


27 


59 


Formosa 


9 


— 


— 


— 


- 


9 


France 


258 


22 


91 


58 


66 


495 


Germany 


666 


57 


185 


302 


195 


1,405 


Ghana 


13 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13 


Greece 


848 


54 


456 


140 


257 


1,755 


Guatemala 


27 


- 


1 


2 


■ — 


30 


Haiti 


158 


1 


9 


5 


10 


183 


Honduras 


102 


- 


9 


— 


1 


112 


Hong Kong 


30 


7 


11 


- 


7 


55 


Hungary 


192 


9 


78 


24 


47 


350 


Iceland 


10 


- 


- 


- 


1 


11 


India 


66 


2 


102 


3 


84 


257 


Indonesia 


33 


- 


1 


33 


7 


74 


Iran 


44 


- 


47 


- 


13 


104 


Iraq_ 


18 


— 


6 


2 


- 


26 


Ireland 


1,462 


3 


58 


138 


139 


1,800 


Israel 


AT 




11 


— 


33 


125 


OJ. 




Italy 


3,667 


51 


692 


299 


1,003 


5,712 


Page Total 




15,709 


654 


4,303 


2,029 


3,326 


26,021 



Jamaica 






BOSTON 
299 


FALL 
RIVER 

4 


LAWRENCE 
5 


SPRING- 
FIELD 

200 


WORCESTER 

7 


TOTAL 
515 


Japan 


64 


12 


9 


117 


29 


'231 


Jordan 


16 


1 


7 


6 


10 


40 


Kenya 


51 


- 


- ■ 


- 


5 


55 


Korea 


67 


1 


21 


28 


25 


142 


Latvia 


102 


2 


4 


5 


7 


120 


Lebanon 


107 


27 


282 


47 


63 


526 


Liberia 


18 


- 


- 


1 


m 


19 


Libya 


11 


- 




1 A 


17 


43 


1 


14 


Lithuania 


255 


- 


37 


5 


88 


385 


Macau 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Malaya 


5 


- 


- 


3 


- 


8 


Mexico 


93 


2 


19 


12 


15 


141 


Montserrat 


151 


- 


- 


1 


- 


152 


Morocco 


9 


1 


- 


7 


- 


17 


Netherlands 


133 


m 


20 


28 


49 


230 


New Zealand 


9 


— 


8 


- 


4 


21 


Nicaragua 


9 


m 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Norway 


52 


40 


3 


4 


10 


109 


Other Countries 


82 


• 


1 


a 


6 


97 


X 




Pakistan 


2 


- 


2 


- 


2 


6 


Palestine 


32 


- 


Ol 


A 


2 


59 


&L 


4 


Panama 


137 


5 


- 


27 


13 


182 


Paraguay 


4 


m 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Peru 


121 


mm 


- 


26 


6 


153 


Philippines 


316 


23 


20 


4 


23 


386 


Poland 


1,207 


115 


280 


282 


604 


2,488 


Portugal 


726 


2,841 


166 


117 


21 


3,871 


Puerto Rico 


12 


- 


1 


1 


4 


18 


Rumania 


49 


- 


6 


4 


10 


69 


Saudi Arabia 


5 


— 


m 


- 


- 


5 


Scotland 


178 


10 


21 


56 


49 


314 


South Africa 


34 


7 


8 


2 


- 


51 


Spain 


97 


12 


13 


36 


21 


179 


St. Lucia 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Sudan 


4 


- 


1 


- 


- 


5 


Sweden 


82 


7 


6 


8 


41 


144 


Switzerland 


68 


— 


a* 


4 


3 


75 


Syria 


100 


1 


13 


11 


12 137 


Thailand 


12 


-. 




3 


11 | 26 


Trinidad 


r,4 1 




14 


4 102 


Turkey 


279 j - j 52 


24 


97 


452 


Ukraine 


33 


1 


— 


5 


2 


41 


U.S.S.R. 


246 


11 


50 


65 


34 


406 


United States 


2,237 


396 


418 


479 


683 


4,213 


Uruguay 


22 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22 


Venezuela 


36 


m 


11 


i 


A 


52 


1 


*i 


Vietnam 


3 


4 


5 


- 


- 


12 


Wales 


7 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


West Indies (Othe 
Yugoslavia 


r) 


129 


- 


1 


5 


- 


135 




103 


1 


23 


4 


25 


156 


Page Total 


7,906 


3,524 


1,535 


1,668 


2,006 


16,639 


1st Page Total 


15,709 


654 


4,303 


2,029 


3,326 


26,021 




23,615 


4,178 






5,332 




GRAND TOTAL 




5,838 


3,697 


42 , 660 













BOSTON 
- 6/30/6f 


FALL 
RIVER 

L C , 


LAWRENCE 
V L I T I E 


SPRING- 
FIELD 

S 


WORCESTER 
All 0ffi< 


TOTAL 


Fiscal Year 7/1/64 






OFFICE 


es 


Abington 


22 








22 


Acton 


12 


- 


1 


- 


- 


13 


Acushne t 


m 


34 


- 


- 


- 


34 


Adams 


7 


- 


- 


11 


- 


18 


Agawam 


- 


mm 


*■ 


46 


- 


46 


Amesbury 


2 


- 


13 


- 


- 


15 


Amherst 


6 


- 


- 


16 


- 


22 


Andover 


13 


- 


126 


- 


- 


139 


Arlington 


288 


- 


- 


mm 


- 


288 


Ashburnham 


1 


- 


. - 


mm 


1 


2 


Ashby 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Ashland 


8 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Athol 


6 


- 


- 


- 


14 


20 


Attleboro 


22 


33 


- 


m 


- 


55 


Auburn 


- 


- 


- 


- 


88 


88 


Avon 


10 


- 


M» 


- 


*• 


10 


Ayer 


78 


- 


5 


- 


5 


88 


Barnstable 


14 


14 








28 


Bar re 


- 


- 


- 


- 


19 


19 


Bedford 


34 


m 


6 


mm 


- 


40 


Belcher town 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Bel ling ham 


20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20 


Belmont 


276 


- 


1 


- 


a, 


277 


Beverly 


64 


- 


20 


• 


m 


84 


Billerica 


33 


• 


7 


- 


m. 


40 


Blandford 


- 


- 


m 


2 


- 


2 


Bolton 


1 


- 


m 


• 


3 


4 


Boston 


10,857 


1 


62 


i 


5 


10,926 


Bourne 


29 


16 


- 


- 


- 


45 


Boxborough 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


Boxford 


1 


• 


- 


- 


— 


1 


Boylston 


- 


m 


M 


- 


32 


32 


Braintree 


57 


- 


mm 


mm 


m 


57 


Bridgev;ater 


15 


14 


- 


tm 


- 


29 


Brockton 


280 


4 


m 


- 


m 


284 


Brookf ield 


1 


- 


m 


- 


27 


28 


Brookline 


794 


- 


5 


- 


- 


799 


Burlington 


69 


- 


- 


- 


- 


69 


Cambridge 


1,821 


ma 


9 


: 


_ 


1,830 


Canton 


45 


m 


5 


- 


m 


50 


Carlisle 


3 


- 


m 


mm 


m 


3 


Carver 


1 


- 


- . 


— 


- 


1 


Charlemont 


- 


- 


m 


1 


— 


1 


Charlton 


- 


- 


- 


— 


37 


37 


Chatham 


1 


M 


- 


m 


- 


1 

















Che 1ms for < 
Chelsea 


i 


BOSTON 
6 


FALL 
RIVER 


< 
LAWRENCE I 

72 


SPRING- 
FIELD WORCESTER 


TOTAL 
78 




248 


- 


1 


- 


m 


249 


Chesterfit 
Chicopee 


j Id 


- 


- 


— 


1 


— 


1 




2 


- 


- 


589 


- 


591 


Clinton 


6 


- 


- 


- 


110 


116 


Cohasset 


4 


- 


- 


- 


— 


4 


Concord 


60 


- 


- 


- 


— 


60 


Dalton 








5 




5 


Danvers 


58 


- 


8 


- 


- 


66 


Dartmouth 
Dedham 




6 


158 


- 


- 


— 


164 




129 


- 


- 


m 


- 


129 


Deerfield 
Dennis 




- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 




- 


2 


- 


— 


- 


2 


Dighton 


- 


12 


- 


- 


- 


12 


Dover 


17 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Dracut 


4 


- 


94 


- 


- 


98 


Dudley 


— 


- 


tm 


- 


81 


81 


Dunstable 
Duxbury 




- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 




23 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23 


East Brool 
East Longr 
Easthamptc 
Easton 


efield 










2 


2 


aeadow 


- 


- 


- 


24 


- 


24 


>n 


m 


- 


- 


17 


- 


17 




8 


■i 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Everett 


307 


— 


- 


- 


- 


307 


Fair haven 


7 


100 






. 


107 


Fall River 


7 


2,266 


- 


- 


- 


2,273 


Falmouth 


40 


39 


- 


- 


- 


79 


Fitchburg 
FoxborougJ: 
Frarainghai 
Franklin 




10 


- 


- 


- 


65 


75 


1 


14 


5 


- 


- 


- 


19 


i 


232 


- 


- 


- 


11 


243 




65 


— 


- 


- 


- 


65 


Gardner 


3 








66 


69 


Georgetown 
Gill 


1 


4 


- 


5 


- 


- 


9 




- 


~ 


- 


4 


- 


4 


Gloucastea 
Grafton 




136 


- 


- 


"* 


- 


136 


t 


6 


7 


- 


- 


105 


118 


Granby 


2 


- 


- 


14 


- 


16 


Great Bari 
Greenfielc 
Groton 


ring ton 


3 


- 


- 


13 


- 


16 


1 


13 


- 


■■ 


5 


- 


18 




2 


- 


5 


- 


- 


7 


Grove land 
Hadley 




1 


- 


6 


- 


- 


7 


— 






■ 


8 




8 


Hamilton 


25 


- 


1 


- 


- 


26 


Hampden 


- 


- 


m 


9 


- 


9 


Hanover 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Hanson 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


» 








* 


- 


■ 





Hardwick 




BOSTON 

1 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 

4 


WORCESTER 
10 


TOTAL 
15 


Harvard 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Harwich 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Hatfield 


4 


- 


- 


7 


- 


11 


Haverhill 


15 


- 


433 


- 


- 


448 


Hingham 


17 


- 


m 


- 


- 


17 


Hoi brook 


49 


- 


- 


- 


- 


49 


Hoi den 


- 


- 


- 


- 


73 


73 


Holland 


- 


- 


w» 


3 


- 


3 


Hoi lis ton 


3 


- 


- 


Ml 


- 


3 


Holyoke 


11 


- 


- 


290 


- 


301 


Hopedale 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


5) 


Hopkinton 


1 


- 


- 


- 


3 


4 


Hudson 


40 


- 


1 


- 


22 


63 


Hull 


49 


- 


M 


- 


- 


49 


Huntington 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Ipswich 


29 










29 


Lake vi lie 


1 








_ 


1 


Lancaster 


37 


- 


- 


- 


70 


107 


Lawrence 


47 


- 


2,520 


12 


- 


2,579 


Leicester 


- 


- 


— 


- 


77 


77 


Lenox 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Leominster 


2 


- 


- 


- 


37 


39 


Lexington 


130 


m 


- 


- 


- 


130 


Lincoln 


26 


- 


- 


- 


- 


26 


Littleton 


16 


- 


4 


- 


- 


20 


Longmeadow 


- 


- 


- 


61 


- 


61 


Lowell 


33 


- 


1,601 


- 


- 


1,634 


Ludlow 


17 


- 




131 


— 


148 


Lunenburg 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Lynn 


341 


- 


11 


- 


- 


352 


Lynnfield 


5 


- 


- 


— 


- 


5 


Maiden 


223 










223 


Manchester 


5 


— 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Mansfield 


16 


1 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Marblehead 


40 


- 


1 




— 


41 


Marion 


3 


- 




- 




3 


Marlborough 


20 


— 


- 


— 


22 


42 


Marshfield 


49 


- 


- 


- 


- 


49 


Mattapoisett 


7 


- 


- 


■ - 


— 


7 


Maynard 


31 


Ml 


• 


— 


— 


31 


Medf ield 


3 


- 


- 


- 


— 


3 


Medford 


343 


- 


- 


m 


• 


343 


Med way 


12 


- 


a* 


- 


- 


12 


Melrose 


89 


- 


3 


- 


m 


92 


Merrimac 


2 


- 


5 


- 


— 


7 


Methuen 


5 


- 


419 


— 


3 


427 


Middle borough 


9 


9 


- 


— 


- 


18 


Middle ton 


3 


- 


- 


— 


— 


3 


Milford 


4 


- 


- 


■> 


112 


116 





















BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 


Mi 11 bury 


— 


m 


49 


49 


Millis 


13 


- 


- 


mm 


- 


13 


Milton 


76 


2 


- 


- 


m 


78 


Monson 


- 


m 


- 


5 


- 


5 


Montague 


- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


5 


Monterey 


mm 


- 


- 


1 


— 


1 




10 












Nahant 


- 


- 


10 


Nantucket 


1 


mi 


- 


■i 


- 


1 


Natick 


199 


- 


m 


— 


- 


199 


Needham 


53 


— 


- 


- 


- 


53 


New Bedford 


39 


1,123 


3 


- 


- 


1,165 


New Braintree 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


New Marlborough 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Newbury 


— 


- 


3 


- 


- 


3 


Newburyport 


9 


- 


6 


- 


- 


15 


Newton 


716 


- 


- 


- 


- 


716 


North Adams 


6 


mi 


Ml 


6 


1 


13 


North Andover 


- 


- 


117 


- 


- 


117 


North Attleborough 


9 


• 


— 


- 


- 


9 


North Reading 


8 


Ml 


7 


- 


- 


15 


Northampton 


2 


Mi 


- 


38 


- 


40 


Nor thbo rough 


2 


- 


- 


- 


46 


48 


Northbridge 


5 


- 


- 


- 


31 


36 


Norton 


5 


9 


- 


- 


- 


14 


Norwell 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Norwood 


139 


- 


- 


- 


2 


141 














3 




Oakham 




3 


Orange 


1 


m 


- 


1 


- 


2 


Orleans 


3 


3 


Ml 


- 


- 


6 


Oxford 


- 


— 


- 


- 


47 


47 


Palmer 








33 




33 


Pax ton 


- 


- 


• 


- 


37 


37 


Pe abody 


133 


— 


9 


- 


- 


142 


Pembroke 


30 


— 


- 


Ml 


- 


30 


Pepperell 


1 


— 




- 


- 


4 


Pittsfield 


18 


— 


- 


27 


- 


45 


Plainville 


4 


- 


— 


- 


- 


4 


Plymouth 


16 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16 


Plympton 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 




366 




6 








Quincy 


m 


372 




36 














Randolph 


- 


36 


Raynham 


7 


9 


- 


- 


- 


16 


Reading 


48 


- 


1 


- 


- 


49 


Rehoboth 


1 


3 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Revere 


190 


2 


2 


- 


- 


194 


Rochester 


1 


- 


- 


- 




1 

























Rockland 


BOSTON 
21 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 
21 


Rockport 


1 


- 


■> 


mm 


- 


1 


Russell 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Rutland 


- 


- 


- 


mm 


30 


30 


Salem 


108 




8 


m 


: 


116 


Salisbury 


- 


- 


8 


- 


- 


8 


Sandwich 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Saugus 


68 


- 


- 


- 


- 


68 


Scituate 


73 


- 


- 


- 


- 


73 


Seekonk 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Sharon 


17 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


She r born 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Shirley 


3 


- 


- 


- 


i 


4 


Shrewsbury 


1 


- 


- . 


- 


214 


215 


Somerset 


2 


115 


m 


- 


- 


117 


Some rvi lie 


787 


- 


- 


- 


- 


787 


South Hadley 


- 


- 


- 


43 


- 


43 


Southampton 


- 


- 


- 


9 


- 


9 


Southborough 


I 


i 


- 


I 


1 


1 


Southbridge 


7 


mm 


- 


- 


122 


129 


Southwick 


- 


- 


- 


17 


- 


17 


Spencer 


9 


- 


mm 


- 


53 


62 


Springfield 


10 


- 


2 


1,944 


7 


1,963 


Stockbridge 


- 


m 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Stoneham 


59 


— 


- 


- 


- 


59 


Stoughton 


45 


3 


1 


- 


- 


49 


Stow 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


St ur bridge 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15 


15 


Sudbury 


15 


- 


- 


- 


«• 


15 


Sutton 


- 


- 


— 


- 


14 


14 


Swampscott 


37 


— 


- 


- 


- 


37 


Swansea 


2 


75 


- 


- 


- 


77 


Taunton 


30 


80 








110 


Temple ton 


- 


m 


— 


- 


2 


2 


Tewksbury 


19 


- 


19 


- 


- 


33 


Tops fie Id 


2 


- 


— 


- 


- 


2 


Tyngsbo rough 


- 


— 


13 


- 


- 


13 


Upton 










2 


2 


Ux bridge 


3 


- 


- 


— 


33 


36 


Wakef ie Id 


49 




' 5 


mm 


mm 


54 


Wales 


- 


«■ 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Walpole 


40 


- 


5 


- 


- 


45 


Walt ham 


435 


m 


1 


- 


9 


445 


Ware 


- 


m 


- 


25 




25 


Ware ham 


11 


3 


- 


- 


- 


14 

















Warren 


BOSTON 

1 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 
5 


TOTAL 
6 


Water town 


463 


- 


13 


- 


- 


476 


Way land 


61 


- 


- 


- 


— 


61 


Webster 


9 


- 


- 


m 


143 


152 


Wellesley 


135 


- 


- 


- 


— 


135 


We 1 If lee t 


9 


- 


- 


- 


— 


9 


Wenham 


1 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


West Boylston 


- 


- 


- 


- 


58 


58 


West Bridge water 


25 


- 


- 


— 


m 


25 


West Brookfield 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15 


15 


West Springfield 


- 


- 


- 


100 


- 


100 


Westborough 


1 


- 


- 


- 


34 


35 


Westfield 


- 


- 


- 


75 


- 


75 


Westford 


9 


- 


13 


— 


- 


22 


Westminster 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Weston 


44 


- 


- 


- 


1 


45 


Westport 


- 


30 


- 


- 


- 


30 


Westwood 


10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


Weymouth 


64 


- 


- 


- 


- 


64 


Whately 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Whi tman 


2 


- 


— 


- 


- 


2 


Wilbraham 


1 


- 


- 


19 


- 


20 


Williamstown 


1 


- 


- 


7 


- 


8 


Wilmington 


29 


- 


1 


- 


- 


30 


Winchendon 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Winchester 


76 


- 


1 


- 


- 


77 


Winthrop 


46 


- 


- 


- 


- 


46 


Woburn 


96 


- 


- 


- 


- 


96 


Worcester 


31 


- 


- 


1 


3,232 


3,264 


Wrentham 


9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Yarmouth 


6 


2 




1 




9 


Out of State 


377 




138 


53 


14 


582 


TOTAL 


23,615 

J 


4,178 

! 

: 


5,838 


3,697 


5,332 


42,660